Nathan Allen

Hello, I’m Nathan Allen. Welcome to my page! This serves as an experiment in shortform as well as a little intro to myself.

I am a freelance (sort of, I'm new to this) writer based in Winston-Salem, NC. My writing tends to focus on the interdisciplinary study of the environment — those places where science, philosophy, psychology, history, and other discipline meet. Other than that, I write about philosophy broadly, LGBTQ+ issues, media studies, and culture.

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I am a writer and editor of Pollen — an interdisciplinary magazine about the environment. In addition, I am a regular writer for Mind Cafe, Frame of Reference, and An Injustice!

It’s confusing, and we could explain it better using an analogy from moral philosophy.

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Photo by Kurt Cotoaga on Unsplash. Remix by editor.

Climate change has brought out the worst in us. You either accept the science or you are a bigot, a climate change denier, or a conspiracy theorist. Many activists will shout to the stars that you just have to look at the data! There’s allegedly SO MUCH OF IT! We often hate on people who are not convinced — and do so to an astonishing degree.

Here’s the deal: I accept the science. I believe that climate change is occurring at an unprecedented rate and humans are the major driver of such change. But to be honest, I have never really looked at the data myself. I completely give myself over to the expert consensus in this case. …

For a while now, Bri Reddick and I have been organizing and running an Instagram account called The Ecofeminist Project (EFP). This environmental education tool has centered ecofeminism as a tool for both cultural analyses as well as democratizing environmental literacy. We see ecofeminism as the refutation of all systems of oppression — intersectionality in practice.

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We are revamping our approach and visual experience. As such, I have decided that in addition to Instagram I would house our informational “Ecofeminist Project Explains” digital zines on Medium, right here on Pollen!

I hope everyone enjoys them! And, of course, follow EFP on Instagram!

Following the history of Kudzu in the United States.

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Image via USDA.

I have heard about Kudzu all my life. Growing up in rural North Carolina, everyone was taught to hate the stuff. We were told that it would eventually eat up all the forests and starve them of light until there was nothing left.

And, it made sense. I lived right next to the Pisgah National Forest and from what I could see, the stuff was taking over. The stands of trees became what looked like dark green billowing hills, only these were in the air. The properties near the forests were encroached on by the slender tendrils that seemed to be looking for their next victim. …

One philosopher, Val Plumwood, on experiencing the death roll of a crocodile and what it means.

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Photo by Daniel Joshua on Unsplash. Remix by editor.

When was the last time you heard about a wild animal attacking a human? And what animal was it? In terms of the numbers, it was likely a snake or a raccoon. More scarily, though, and what you probably remember is an animal like a shark, bear, or mountain lion (especially in my home country of the U.S.).

Attacks from megafauna are quite rare, but that does not stop them from filling our brains with fears and uncomfortable emotions. Unlike something like a snake or raccoon bite where we are not afraid of being eaten, larger animals can often inspire such visions. …

You haven’t because I made it up — to describe the perpetual killing of animals on a mass scale.

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Photo by Ruth Caron on Unsplash. Remix by editor.

Recently, there has been a lot of conversation in the vegan movement; and as a result, a lot of drama. It makes sense if you think about it. As a movement grows it is more likely to start to fracture into different sects that believe the movement’s main tenets to varying degrees.

The conversation being had in recent weeks is on the topic of white supremacy in the vegan movement; or more specifically, it has been some people’s unwillingness to publically disavow white supremacy that allegedly is rampant in the mainstreams of veganism.

Beyond this issue though, there has been an uproar surrounding a particular person, James Aspey. Mr. Aspey is a long time vegan advocate who was made famous by a 2014 pledge to not speak a word for the entire year. This stunt was a part of his activism to give the spotlight to the literal voiceless of our society — the animals. …

A superstar conservationist in Colombia was recently killed. Gonzalo Cardona Molina was a Colombian conservationist who is responsible for saving two species of parrots: the yellow-eared parrot and the indigo-winged…

Did you think that 2020 was pretty hot? It turns out that it was pretty much tied with 2016 for the hottest year on record. According to the New York…

About

Nathan Allen

writer. illustrator. manic collector of pens and notebooks. bug guy from North Carolina. see my work at www.nthnljms.com

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